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The Easter Rising: 100 years later Part 2

The Easter Rising (also known as The Easter Rebellion) began on April 24, 1916 and has remained a controversial part of Irish history for the last century. The politics behind it are complicated, and emotions still run high among the Irish and the British.

The Easter Rising is one of the most important and bloodiest parts of Irish history. What of the aftermath? The British, while caught by surprise at the uprising, quickly rallied their troops and began to gain control of the situation. By Wednesday that week the British had landed more troops in Ireland, after hundreds of casualties on both sides, the Irish, realizing they were out gunned, backed down.

The fifteen leaders of the rising were imprisoned in Kilmainham Gaol, just outside Dublin. All fifteen were sentenced to death for treason. At the time, many Irish people were resentful of the rebels for causing so much death and destruction, as they did not fully support the cause for Irish independence. Approximately three thousand people believed to be involved in the rising either directly or indirectly were arrested, and eighteen hundred of them were sent to prison in England without a trial. These executions and imprisonments, along with months of martial law, turned the hearts of the Irish who had not originally agreed with the rebels. They began to resent anew the British rule, and began to work toward independence.

In 1918 the Sinn Fein party ( whose purpose was Irish independence)  won a majority of the Irish seats in parliament, then refused to sit in the UK parliament. In 1919 they met and convened an Irish parliament and declared Ireland’s independence. Following this the Irish Republican Army began using guerilla tactics to fight against the British rule. In 1921 a cease-fire was called, and a treaty was signed with the British resulting in the establishment of the Irish Free State, a self-governing part of the United Kingdom. Six Northern Irish states remained as part of the UK, and remain still today despite the twenty-six states who officially declared independence on Easter Monday, April 18, 1949. Today in Ireland and England, there are still factions at war with one another.

In the one hundred years since the beginning of the fight for independence, Ireland has changed and yet remains the same. Emotions run high on both sides, while some view the original fifteen as heroes, others see them as terrorists and treasonists. It remains to be seen if the two countries can completely come together, and fully lay down arms.

the easter rising

Courtesy of history.com

For more information on the Easter Rising, check out the following websites:

http://www.history.com/topics/british-history/easter-rising

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/ireland-1845-to-1922/the-1916-easter-rising/

 


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The Easter Rising: 100 years later

The Easter Rising (also known as The Easter Rebellion) began on April 24, 1916 and has remained a controversial part of Irish history for the last century. The politics behind it are complicated, and emotions still run high among the Irish and the British.

The short version:

Many Irish people had felt that Britain paid no attention and had no care for the welfare of the Irish, who had been under British rule since 1171, and had been considered part of the United Kingdom since 1801. Although Ireland had seats in British Parliament, they believed they had little say in governing themselves and therefore were treated as second class citizens and allowed to suffer and starve (especially during the Great Famine which claimed thousands of lives between 1845 and 1847) under British rule. A group of Irish nationalists (members of the Irish Volunteers as well as the Irish Republican Brotherhood) planned to use force to oust the British from Ireland, thereby making it independent.

On the afternoon of April 24, 2016 the General Post Office in Dublin was taken over by the insurgents and the Proclamation was read. Four Courts, Jacobs Factory, Boland’s Bakery, and other important buildings around Dublin were likewise occupied, as well as places around all parts of Ireland. The hub of the conflict was the General Post Office, and that was where the headquarters was located.

During the next week, bloody conflict raged throughout Dublin. More than 400 people lost their lives, and at the end of the week PH Pearse, one of the leaders of the rising, declared unconditional surrender “ In order to prevent further slaughter of the civil population and in the hope of saving the lives of our followers, the members of the Provisional Government present at headquarters have decided on an unconditional surrender, and commandants or officers commanding districts will order their commands to lay down arms.  P.H. Pearse, Dublin 30th April 1916.” (for the source of this quote visit taoiseach.gov.ie)

the Easter Rising

photo courtesy of anpost.ie

The British reaction to the rising was swift and bloody.

Please join us next Monday, March 28 for more on The Easter Rising.

 


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Snug as a Bug in a Pub

What is snug? According to Merriam-Webster online some synonyms are:   comfortable, cozy, snug, easy, restful, enjoying or providing a position of contentment and security.

Celtic Ranch Whiskey Snug

Our Brand New Whiskey Snug!

comfortable applies to anything that encourages serenity, well-being, or complacency as well as physical ease <started feeling comfortable in our new surroundings>. cozy suggests warmth, shelter, assured ease, and friendliness <a cozy neighborhood coffee shop>. snug suggests having just enough space for comfort and safety but no more <a snug little cottage>.easy implies relief from or absence of anything likely to cause discomfort or constraint <living in easy circumstances>. restful applies to whatever induces or contributes to rest or relaxation <a quiet restful vacation>

A Snug is also a small, private room in a pub, a cozy spot designed to provide privacy, comfort, and relaxation. That sounds lovely, doesn’t it? Who doesn’t want a nice quiet place to relax and enjoy their favorite libation far from the madding crowd?

Traditionally a snug would be a small, private room with a frosted glass external window where people could drink without being seen, frequently it was reserved for the wealthy, and the beer was a higher price. It was also used by anyone who wished to enjoy a drink without being seen, for example ladies would imbibe in the snug when it was unseemly for them to be seen drinking in public. The snug also offered a private haven for the local police officers or priests who didn’t wish to be seen drinking. At times a snug would also be a discreet place for a romantic tryst, where the lovers could have privacy.

There are very few traditional  snugs left in the public houses of Ireland and Britain, but this long-standing tradition won’t die, thanks to The Celtic Ranch and our own Terry Kast.

Charmed by the whole concept of the snug, Terry and her team of ranchers have been diligently preparing a snug for your enjoyment. It will feature a wide array of whiskey, scotch, and beers, as well as a delightfully quiet atmosphere in which to enjoy your favorite drink. Keep updated by visiting the website, and our facebook page.

We look forward to seeing you there!

snug

Slainte!

 


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Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned beef and cabbage is a traditional St. Patrick’s day meal in the United States, most commonly it is served with Colcannon, or another type of potato. What a lovely Irish dish! Except that it isn’t Irish at all, but is American in origin.

First, corned beef is a salt-cured meat, so named because it uses large pieces (or corns) of salt. There’s not a bit of corn to be seen. Besides being used in corned beef and cabbage, it is used in many dishes including corned beef hash, sandwiches, and Montreal smoked meat. The salt acts as a preservative for the meat, and gives it a pinkish color, even when cooked. Now, the origins may trace back to the Irish, who used bacon in traditional dishes, and may have substituted the corned beef as a less expensive alternative.

Cabbage may have been a substitute for potatoes, as they were more expensive and cabbage offered a hearty alternative. When cooked with the beef, it became the spicy delicacy we serve today.

Potatoes are a traditionally Irish dish, served at almost every meal, so for Americans or Irish immigrants to add this was a natural step. Corned beef and cabbage recipes call for an addition of carrots to add extra flavor and nutrition to the dish.

How do you cook a good corned beef and cabbage? It really is easy, crock pots, and roasting pans are the most commonly used methods, and the addition of the cabbage is made about halfway through the cooking process, giving the cabbage time to soak up the flavors of the meat without getting unappealingly soggy. Potatoes can be added when the meat starts, or cooked separately and combined with butter and the cooked cabbage from the meat to make Colcannon. We also found some great recipes on allrecipes.com

corned beef

Corned beef and cabbage, allrecipes.com

We love buying our corned beef from a local company, Boyles Corned Beef, which can be found in grocery stores locally and nationally. They have the best advice on cooking this particular delicacy.

“Low and slow is the best way to prepare cured or “corned” meat-an hour per pound is the general rule of thumb.”

So whether you’re cooking for St. Patrick’s Day, or for an every day hearty meal, remember that while this is an Irish inspired dish, it’s origins are as American as apple pie.

Corned beef and cabbage

Boyles Kansas City Corned Beef

 

 


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St. Patrick’s Day In Ireland

The biggest St. Patrick’s day celebrations in the world take place, naturally, in Ireland. Throughout the country there are festivals to celebrate the beloved Saint Patrick. In many areas of Ireland, there are street markets, parades, music, and other entertainment. Sure, the pub is a great place to be, but there’s so much more!

In Limerick, there is a parade which features national puppeteers, dance groups, celebrities and more. 80,000 people are expected to line the streets of Limerick to watch a parade featuring 4,000 participants. There is an international band championship, which actually takes place for several days during the St. Patrick celebration. Other festivities include horse races, free drinks at local restaurants, and much, much more!

County Cork’s celebration of St. Patrick includes a parade, festival market, and circus performers as well as a parade. Like most of Ireland, their festival takes place over several days.

Derry-Londonderry has an Irish Language Week, with events throughout the city. County Wexford’s parade is considered the oldest in Ireland. Dingle starts their celebration at 6am, the Dingle Fife and Drum Band kicks it off playing throughout the streets.

In Northern Ireland, County Armaugh has a huge celebration of St. Patrick, including a carnival procession, special dinners, and lectures about the historical significance of the saint.

Of course there’s Dublin, international city, home of Guinness, Trinity College, and a huge St. Patrick festival! Of course there’s a parade, music shows, shopping, and Guinness (an estimated 7.5 million pints consumed on St. Patrick’s Day).  This year’s parade theme, Imagine If, has been inspired by the imagination of the youth of Ireland as they look to the future …..the next 100 years. See the making of the 2016 Festival Parade right here.

These festivals last for several days, sometimes even a week. More than just parades and beer, they’re festivals celebrating St. Patrick and his spiritual and cultural contribution to Ireland. Should you make it to one of these, all we can say is:

Slánte!

St. Patrick

St. Patrick’s Day in Dublin
Photo from http://www.stpatricksfestival.ie/

 


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Patrick: Patron Saint of Ireland

St. Patrick’s Day is more than just a celebration of all things Irish, it’s the celebration of the spirit of the Irish people, embodied in a single man.

St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the end of the fourth century. He is believed to have died on March 17, around 460 A.D. Patrick was taken prisoner around the age of 16 by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family’s estate. They brought  him to Ireland and sold him into slavery where he spent six years as a shepherd, and during which time he learned the Irish language, and prayed, becoming immersed in his Christian spirituality where he found solace.

He had two visions, one which told him to return to his home, the second told him the boat was ready. He walked 200 miles to the coast, boarded the ship and returned to his native land. After he returned home he traveled to Gaul and joined the priesthood, studying under St. Germanus, he was consecrated as a bishop, and sent to Ireland.

He was sent to succeed St Palladius, who had not had much success converting the Irish, but Patrick had a dream of the voices of the Irish , entreating him to return. His depth of faith enabled him to return to the land of his enslavement where he worked diligently to convert the Irish to Christianity.

It took much work, because the Irish were unwilling to convert, and had trouble relating to the “new” religion. Patrick kept his faith, and through his teachings of Christ on the cross, and by using the three leaves of the native shamrock plant to explain the Holy Trinity he was able to convert much of the country and earned the nickname ” enlightener of Ireland”

Patrick

Shamrock of Ireland Photo courtesy of Irish Culture and Customs

Patrick’s great love of the Irish, despite his slavery at their hands early in his life enabled him to save them, this noble cause is why we celebrate him and he has become a symbol of Ireland representing not just the religious faith of the Irish, but also the perseverance of the Irish people against seemingly great odds. His humility in his mission is widely known, and the following quote attributed to him.

“I owe it to God’s grace that through me so many people should be born again to Him.”

Perseverance, grace, humility. It doesn’t get more Irish than that.


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HERLIFE Magazine photo spread The Celtic Ranch

We’re proud that The Celtic Ranch is featured in the trendsetter section of  HERLIFE Magazine Kansas City this month, it’s a beautiful spread with photos taken in Terry’s barn. No sneak peeks, you’ll have to go look at the spread!

“HERLIFE Magazine is a full color publication with the mission of Keeping Women Connected. Each month our magazines are dedicated to the celebration of all that is exceptional in our communities. From the inspirational women we promote to interesting topics such as health, beauty and fashion to what’s going on locally in each community, we strive to keep today’s women connected to the things they need and want.”-HERLIFE Magazine


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Patty’s Day or Paddy’s Day? What’s the Deal?

We’re going to broach a huge controversy. Patty’s Day or Paddy’s Day? Patty’s Day makes more sense as a diminutive in the English spelling of Patrick, if you’re Irish, however, that’s a no go.

Why? St. Patrick’s name in Irish is Naomh (Saint) Pádraig (Patrick), the modern Irish typically use Patrick, but to be grammatically correct when shortening Patrick’s Day use Paddy’s Day. If you must, although shortening it is also frowned upon. Ultimately, the most correct greeting is “Happy St. Patrick’s Day!”

Want to impress your friends with your knowledge on St. Patrick’s Day? Besides correctly spelling the abbreviation, use this Irish Gaelic greeting: Lá fhéile Pádraig sona dhuit! (Happy St. Patrick’s Day to You!) pronounce it  lah leh PAH-drig SUN-uh gwitch! 

While we’re at it, here are some Paddy’s Day dos and don’ts:

  1. St. Paddy’s Day-correct St. Patty’s Day makes you look like a gobshite (idiot)
  2. Learn some authentic slang, this will help you talk to your friends when they get bolloxed (very drunk).
  3. Slang for drunk: bolloxed, fluthered, gee-eyed, hammered, langers or langered, locked, motherless, mouldy (also means rotten), ossified, paralytic, plastered, polluted, shlossed, stocious, twisted (thank you to irishabroad.com for the slang)
  4. Don’t drink green beer (do we need to explain?)
  5. Wear green sparingly

    Paddy's Day

    St. Patrick’s Day Green!

  6. Be respectful, this is a holiday meant to celebrate a revered spiritual leader of the Irish people, the patron saint of Ireland. Getting drunk and acting the git (a horrible person) is insulting to a noble people.

Most of all, have fun! There are parades, parties, music, and church services celebrating this great man, enjoy them whatever your heritage.

Remember, on St. Paddy’s Day, everyone is Irish!


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